Thursday, February 6, 2020

The Invention of the Printing Press Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3500 words

The Invention of the Printing Press - Essay Example Which of these should I look into and what criteria should I use to make my mind on a judgment After much thought, I realized some things: I cannot look at the results of the events since the effects are just enormous to be weighed by anyone; I also cannot look at factors such as the people involved and the efforts they have put that eventually led to the discovery or invention because again, such can lead to a chain of infinite events and circumstances. Hence, since neither its roots nor consequences may help in finding out which of the two events are greater, I had to look at some other viable criteria. Eventually, after going through the readings, I realized that there is one more avenue I never looked at. That is, the avenue of the relation between these two events! Simply, are the invention of the printing press and the discovery of the modern scientific method related at all, in any way The answer to that question, which is a yes (and I will expound on that in this paper), gave me also the answer to the debate going on in my head. There is a relation, and the relation is that of causality, one partially caused the other, making the other partially dependent on that which caused it. At least for these two, the answer was not difficult to find: the printing press acted as partial material cause for the eventual coming of the modern scientific method. So, at least within the philosophical realm of instrumental causality, the invention of the printing press has primacy over the discovery of the scientific method. With this, my question for those who would say otherwise would be: Would the modern scientific method, as we know it, be possible if not for the partial material causality provided by the printing press Given my main question whose answer rest I now provide my thesis statement: The printing press, being an instrumental cause of some of the great developments in the west (including the discovery of the scientific method) from the time of its invention to the present, makes the invention of the press a more important historical event than the discovery of the modern scientific method. To be able to prove my thesis statement, I will divide the discussions of this paper into three parts: The printing press is an instrumental cause of some of the great developments in the West; the printing press is an instrumental cause even of the scientific method; Conclusion. The Printing Press is an Instrumental Cause of the Developments in the West At the invention of the printing press in 1440 came other developments as well: the exploration age, the renaissance, the reformation, the initiation of the information age, and of course, the modern scientific period. In this part of the essay, I will show how the printing press was an instrumental cause of these developments. But before I proceed, I will first define what an instrumental cause is. An instrumental cause, according to Aristotle, is an aid to an efficient cause in coming up with an effect. So for example, the brush and other things

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

The drugging of our children Essay Example for Free

The drugging of our children Essay Are young children early on exposed to psychotropic medications due to lack of medical attention? Do millions of children in these countries really have ADD or ADHD? These questions arise all over North America, Great Britain, and Australia. Drugging of children at young ages is the result of self-diagnoses, teacher diagnoses, and lack of medical care and treatment for children with the â€Å"disease† of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In the documentary The Drugging of our Children, Gary Null, Forever Living Products, 2005, DVD Web, brings about the argument. Back in the 1980’s and 1990’s children began to be put on many different drugs for their behavior in school, the main drug being Ritalin. In the documentary, Null speaks out to parents of children that are on medication by interviewing many different parents, physicians, and education committees about the use of Ritalin and other psychotropic medications in young children. All of these things that are being evaluated of the child’s behavior is at school, and is compared to the expected behavior of that particular teacher’s classroom. The film goes on explain how teachers diagnose those more challenging students with either ADD or ADHD and have them forced to put their kid on a medication to â€Å"cure† their so called disease. After showing each case and their stories, the film also reflects the long term effects of the medications also. The process of diagnosing a child with ADD or ADHD starts in the school environment. Teachers early on look for flaws in students in regards to classroom disruption. There is a list of nine elements including: can’t sit in seat, fidgets, jumping out of chair, doesn’t wait his turn, blurts out answer before question is finished being asked, careless mistakes in schoolwork etc. If the teacher can identify at least six out of the nine characteristics, then she has the authority to tell the parent that their child will be sent to a special needs school program. They will also tell parents that their child needs to be medicated for this disease. Dr. James Schaller of the Medical College of Pennsylvania (Life Script; James Louis Schaller, MD) believes that one must rule everything out first and then see the actual problem before considering medication. It is common in this day and age for people to accuse the hyperactive child of their parents not knowing how to raise or control them. Dr. Michael D. Fraser states that parenting style is not a cause of ADD and ADHD but that it’s hereditary and can even have to do with things like low birth weight, diet, and allergies. Needleman stated that, â€Å"It has also been claimed that exposure to lead can cause delinquent behavior in children†. The number one symptom of ADD or ADHD is â€Å"Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat†, stated by Peter Breggin, MD. Null only gets facts and stories from people that have been negatively affected by the use of psychotropic medications and doctors that are against the use of them. The audience is only able to wrap the mind around tragic situations that’ll lead to agreement with the argument presented. It was observed that as children got older, school shootings became more common. The cause of this was claimed to be that children now days had easier access to guns in the home. Researchers looked further into this answering their own questions like â€Å"Weren’t guns easy to access in the 1950’s and 1960’s? † In fact, yes, it was just as easy, if not easier for children to get their hands on guns then also. Physicians looked further into the children committing these acts. Miguel Humara, Ph. D states that, â€Å"The most effective form of treatment for ADD and ADHD are cognitive behavioral therapy, and psychotropic medication†. All of the children featured in the film had a history of being on some sort of psychotropic medication, the most common being Ritalin. These drugs are most commonly meant for people ages eighteen years or older, but doctors were being lazy and just prescribing these drugs to small children also. Comparing an eighteen year old on Ritalin to a seven year old on it, they had different side effects. While the eighteen year old was experiencing headache and vomiting, the seven year old was hallucinating and unconsciously doing violent acts. Obvious to viewers that these had long term consequences to younger aged children. This information makes sense and is valid from people with first-hand experience, but what about the people with no horrendous side effects? What about the doctors that do rule out everything before trying out medicine? These things should have also been addressed throughout the film for accurate accusation. The argument is strong and makes the audience think about medicating young children and is definitely persuasive in making them agree. This argument makes the audience think more in depth of the side effects of medication on young children in both their short term and long term effects. Null, throughout the entire film, speaks to the audience through the credibility of doctors, educators, and parents that have lived through experiences. This is an effective way to grab the attention of the audience with real life stories of victims. It makes the audience feel as if they know the victim and can have sympathy for their experience and therefore be able to agree with the argument, making the argument effective. In reality, young children are going to be a bit hyper and squirmy in their childhood and shouldn’t be look at as diseased or troubled. They need time to grow up and understand acceptable behavior. Though teachers and parents quickly make the assumption that there is something wrong, doctors need to be the ones to make the ultimate decision. Therefore, drugging of young children is the result of self-diagnoses, teacher diagnoses, and lack of medical attention and care for those with ADD and ADHD.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Medieval Ballads and Lyrics :: essays research papers fc

Recently, the term ‘ballad’ can be associated with everything from Solomon’s Song to an Aerosmith song. The dictionary defines it as a traditional story in song or a simple song. However, the medieval ballad is something of a different nature than that of the popular musical ballads of today. The definition of ballad in the medieval context is a narrative poem. The authors usually remain anonymous and the ballad is more often than not accompanied by dance (Gummere). This is not surprising considering the word ‘ballad’ comes from the Latin word ‘ballare,’ meaning ‘to dance’ (Dixon). Almost all ballads follow the same distinct criteria. They are all performed by a minstrel or troubadour complemented by music and are normally performed for an audience. All ballads tell a story with major themes of revenge, envy, betrayal, loyalty, and superstition, although they may touch on other subjects. These stories only focus on one major event and can be about the dramatic events of heroes or every day people. Though the bulk of the stories begin in the middle of an event, there is very little background information given (Knight). Characters rarely show any development and most stories lack detail. It is also important to know that there are there are three types of ballads: traditional ballads, broadside ballads and literary ballads (Dixon). Traditional ballads originated from ‘folk tales’ or other anecdotes told by peasants in England. These were most commonly passed by oral tradition. The broadside ballad is the traditional ballad’s cousin in many ways. These ballads were more common in urban or city like areas in the 16th century and were more likely to be printed and handed out instead of performed. The literary ballad is a combination of both the traditional and broadside types. These ballads appeared in the 18th century when ballads began to be published (Gummere). Medieval ballads, of course, are in the category of traditional ballads. When studying medieval ballads, it is important to remember that the entertainment in the medieval period did not include television or computers. Medieval ballads were very lengthy to capture people’s attention for long periods of time. This is how the stories were passed from one generation to the next. The passing of ballads orally was the most popular. Francis James Child was the first to put together a collection of over 300 ballads (Child). The only ballads that can be traced are those, which have been written. Medieval Ballads and Lyrics :: essays research papers fc Recently, the term ‘ballad’ can be associated with everything from Solomon’s Song to an Aerosmith song. The dictionary defines it as a traditional story in song or a simple song. However, the medieval ballad is something of a different nature than that of the popular musical ballads of today. The definition of ballad in the medieval context is a narrative poem. The authors usually remain anonymous and the ballad is more often than not accompanied by dance (Gummere). This is not surprising considering the word ‘ballad’ comes from the Latin word ‘ballare,’ meaning ‘to dance’ (Dixon). Almost all ballads follow the same distinct criteria. They are all performed by a minstrel or troubadour complemented by music and are normally performed for an audience. All ballads tell a story with major themes of revenge, envy, betrayal, loyalty, and superstition, although they may touch on other subjects. These stories only focus on one major event and can be about the dramatic events of heroes or every day people. Though the bulk of the stories begin in the middle of an event, there is very little background information given (Knight). Characters rarely show any development and most stories lack detail. It is also important to know that there are there are three types of ballads: traditional ballads, broadside ballads and literary ballads (Dixon). Traditional ballads originated from ‘folk tales’ or other anecdotes told by peasants in England. These were most commonly passed by oral tradition. The broadside ballad is the traditional ballad’s cousin in many ways. These ballads were more common in urban or city like areas in the 16th century and were more likely to be printed and handed out instead of performed. The literary ballad is a combination of both the traditional and broadside types. These ballads appeared in the 18th century when ballads began to be published (Gummere). Medieval ballads, of course, are in the category of traditional ballads. When studying medieval ballads, it is important to remember that the entertainment in the medieval period did not include television or computers. Medieval ballads were very lengthy to capture people’s attention for long periods of time. This is how the stories were passed from one generation to the next. The passing of ballads orally was the most popular. Francis James Child was the first to put together a collection of over 300 ballads (Child). The only ballads that can be traced are those, which have been written.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

The novel “Frankenstein” can be seen to have been inspired by events and experiences in Mary Shelley’s own life

Mary Shelley's young age while writing the novel â€Å"Frankenstein† in 1816 seems not to be distinguished with serious life experience which could influence her world famous work. This first impression proves to be wrong when reading her biography. We find a lot of personal, literary and political-philosophical factors forming her mind. The life of the tender woman is marked by grief from the very beginning. It is not impossible that she has carried some feeling of guilt because only a few days after she has been born her mother dies. The arrival of the new daughter instead of bringing happiness to the family throws it into deep despair. It is possible to link this first tragic event in Mary Shelley's life with the thoughts of Frankenstein before his death: â€Å"I, not in deed, but in effect, was the real murderer. â€Å"(p. 90). Later after the discovery of the body of Henry Clerval, analysing Frankenstein's bitter conclusion, we could build our reflection into the same direction. Why not assume a subconscious guilt to have followed Mary Shelley all her life? She could think that her half-sister might not have committed suicide if their mother has been alive. The next tragedy – finding Henrietta (P. B. Shelley's wife) drowned – could also be associated. Psychologically it is not an exception for a wife abandoned by her husband to kill herself. A nearly direct reminder of a possible self-accusation by the writer is the first person form of the Frankenstein narrative: â€Å"I called myself the murderer of William, of Justine, and of Clerval† (P. 171). A similar collection of negative features could lead us towards the sinful heroes of Godwin's book â€Å"Caleb Williams†, 1794, (Kindle. M. The claims of Caleb about himself are very close to those of Shelley's hero: â€Å"My offense has merely been a mistaken thirst for; knowledge† It seems the shadow of the dead parent has haunted Mary even without any actual memory of the funeral of her dead mother. Impressions are apparently included in the idea for the similar picture over the mantle-piece in Frankenstein's library which has â€Å"represented Caroline Beaufort in an agony of despair, kneeling by the coffin if her dead father. † (p. 75). It is understandable that Mary is acutely depressed after losing her first baby just one year before he beginning of the writing of â€Å"Frankenstein†. According to the notes in her Journal (Hindle M. p. xv) it has been very difficult for her to accept this death and she has had dreams that by rubbing the baby before the fire it could come back to life again. Obviously such a vision is prominent in the whole novel, subtitled â€Å"The Modern Prometheus†, being impressed not as much by Aeschylus's version of the legend as by Ovid's one. The English author includes in it many of the progressive ideas of her epoch, especially those coming from science. There is firm evidence of Mary Shelley's substantial education and profound interest in the latest biological research. She is attracted by the contemporary work of the physician Dr. Erasmus Darwin and the chemist Sir Humphry Davy, just as Frankenstein is impressed by an early experience with electricity. The young woman has not been a stranger to active political life either, due to the direct involvement of her father in it. We could link all the conservative attacks against him with the reaction towards the monster. Under the sway of the French Revolution, William Godwin shows explicitly his atheism, i. e. his differentiating from everyone. Inheriting and sharing her father's unusual ideas, the daughter displays her insight in the novel about creating life in contrast with the wide spread tradition. The-influence of her history studies is transformed into Frankenstein's over sophisticated conclusions about some important world happenings. Pondering on the interference of his laboratory work with his family relationship he generalises: â€Å"†¦ f no man allowed any pursuit whatsoever to interfere with the tranquility of his domestic affections, Greece had been not enslaved; Caesar would have spared his country†¦ † (P. 54). Being well educated, Mary Shelley is probably aware enough of the real reasons for the events her hero lists. The purpose of such unjustified estimation is more likely to be the author's aim to show Frankenstein's excessive self-confidence in his own intellectual potential power and the exaggerating of the individual significance. His forename is not chosen accidentally. It is like a prediction of victory. Unfortunately we discover a hidden irony there. The insanity of his desires protrudes from the background of the looming mighty Alps in the numerous magnificent descriptions of the imposing mountain chain. It is not enough to underline the unison or contradictions between the characters' actions and the grand natural pictures. The presence of the awesome Alps in the book is not only an influence from the splendid location where the novel was conceived but also we receive the impression that the mountain has even an independent role in the narrative. The silent â€Å"actor† helps us to see clearer the contrast with the monomaniacal performance of the main hero. We understand that the might belongs only to Nature and that nobody should dare to compete with it. As such fighting takes a lot of time and effort, during the long six years Frankenstein devotes all his attention to the planned hard experiment. The researcher's engrossment in the scientific enterprise could be an allusion to Mr. Godwin's busy style of life. The lack of emotional contact with his daughter is presented both in the letters of Frankenstein's father and especially in the character of the monster. His determination to kill those dearest to Frankenstein is driven by the need to demonstrate the misery of being without friends and family. Despite the ferociously conducted duel between the main players, the author endeavours to invoke our sympathy for the appalling looking hero. Her searching, restless spirit dictates the tendency towards the unconventional and astonishing. Mary Shelley dares to be in contradiction even with the genre she uses to write the book. It is commented on immediately in 1818 by Sir Walter Scott in his article introducing the new title in Scotland: â€Å"†¦ he tale, though wild in incident, is written in plain and forcible English, without exhibiting that mixture of hyperbolical German with which tales of wonder are usually told, as if it were necessary that the language should be as extravagant as the fiction. † (Scott, W. , 1818). Mary Shelley changes the face of the Gothic genre being inspired by Cervantes' â€Å"Don Quixote† which she reads while writing â€Å"Frankenstein†. She follows the example of the great Spanish prosaic who comes to the idea of contradicting the existing knight's literature exactly as Shelley achieves a unique Gothic novel. Cervantes' influence is not only on the level of motivation but also hi presenting of the main heroes. While both desire to help other people they bring them nothing but misery. The scene with the dying Frankenstein on Walton's ship reminds us intensely of the mad speeches of Don Quixote. Both heroes try to contaminate with their ridiculous ideas the people surrounding them – Sancho Panza and other servants or the mariners who prefer to continue their journey back home. The distinguishing features of Mary Shelley's presentation on the literary scene are widely discussed. Her contribution to the development of English is also noticed by other critics. Just like her parents she is not afraid to think and act differently. The â€Å"excellence of language and peculiar interest† impresses the critic for The Belle Assemblee who says: â€Å"This work†¦ has as well as originality and an easy energetic style†¦ â€Å". Even today's readers, whose opinions are often based on mass-media productions, are pleasantly surprised by the delightful manner of writing. Despite the expectation of finding a story of horror and nightmares, the plot is saturated with lyrical diversions. These appear due to the direct sensitive influences of both family and close circle of friends. Among the contemporaries Mary Shelley reads with serious excitement romantic poets. Her imagination is preoccupied by the Coleridge's â€Å"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner† whose ideas she puts in the minds of both heroes – Dr Frankenstein and Captain Walton. Both are obsessed by the rhythm of the poem and quote from it to describe their own condition or determination. This brings additional charm to the gripping story. Reading nearly any stanza from the â€Å"Ancient Mariner† we can envisage the fascinating power of the epic over the young writer. Its elevating sound is extremely topical just after the time of the French Revolution: * Alone, alone, all, all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea! And never a saint took pity on My soul in agony. The spread out alliteration expands the boundaries of the immeasurable ocean as ajnetaphor of freedom and independence. Similar feelings have thrilled Mary Shelley while reading â€Å"Emil† by Jean Jacques Rousseau. It encourages the ideas of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity -the stimulation for the armed insurrection and the insistence on human rights through the character of the monster. Rousseau's ideas elaborated by Godwin in his â€Å"Political Justice† are the best explanation for the transforming of the creature into a villain due to treatment by society. A lot of other writers and their books have contributed to forming the views which Mary Shelley conveyed in her riveting novel. Whatsoever is the impact on â€Å"Frankenstein† one is undoubted – the envied talent of Mary Shelley to combine all her knowledge, intuitive capacities and innate genius for developing a real masterpiece.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Maslow s Hierarchy Of Needs - 2800 Words

Throughout life, one’s personality is a very important aspect of that individual’s wellbeing. Such characteristics are not only used by others in attempts to understand their peers, but also determine one’s own satisfaction and view of themselves. People are always attempting to change who they are for the better, in efforts to live a more satisfying and self-fulfilling life through achieving higher personal needs. With that said, when studying the psychological basis behind one’s development and change in personality, one specific theory and stance seems to explain this phenomenon of bettering one’s self; that of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. This stance, embedded in the humanistic perspective, suggests that individuals are motivated to self-actualize, but such a task can only be accomplished if basic human needs are obtained beforehand (Funder, 2013). With that said, there are specific requirements presented within the hierarchy which one needs to obtain in order to ultimately improve their well-being. These five needs include an individual’s physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs (McLeod, 2007). Considering the movie â€Å"Groundhog Day,† a character by the name of Phil Connors continues to relive the same day endlessly, regardless of what he does. As a result Connors goes through an extreme personality change which can be best described through the standpoint of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Phil Connor’s Personality Described Phil Connors is anShow MoreRelatedMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1741 Words   |  7 PagesMaslow’s hierarchy of needs and Herzberg’s. The Maslow’s hierarchy of needs include five levels, and at the certain extent, reflect the rule of human s activities on psychological and behavior. Herzberg’ describe the more details of worker agree or disagree about working. In this essay, more related knowledge details and effects will de described, then, analysis the two theories individual, choose a better one. II. Describe the two theories. 2.1Maslow’s hierarchy of needs The Maslow’s hierarchy of needsRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1536 Words   |  7 Pagesunderstanding of how to motivate different personality types. In the research I am going to compare Maslow’s hierarchy of needs against Lawrence and Nohira’s 4 drive theory in an attempt to better understand their possible uses inside an organizational structure. Let’s first take a look a look at the two theories before discussing their potential benefit. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. We need to keep in mind that Maslow’s field was phycology, so his research was done from a medical viewpoint more soRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1524 Words   |  7 PagesSummary of Maslow’s The Hierarchy of Needs Abraham Maslow developed the theories of motivation because he felt that the sophistication of human behavior could not be portrayed through reinforcement or rewards. He felt that human action were directed toward realization and fulfillments and that behavior could be gratified while using multiple types of needs at the same time. Maslow wanted to find positive motivation as to why people react or engage in certain behaviors. He felt that basic survivalRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1295 Words   |  6 PagesMaslow’s hierarchy of needs (p. 379 in EP)? Outline each level and discuss how it relates to motivation. Abraham Maslow was born in 1908 in Brooklyn, New York. He originally studied law because of the influence of my parents, but after marrying his first cousin, Bertha Goodman, and moving to Wisconsin, he became interested in psychology. After achieving his Masters in Psychology, Maslow moved back to Brooklyn and started teaching at a school there. â€Å"One of the many interesting things Maslow noticedRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs982 Words   |  4 PagesAbraham Maslow was one of the most influential and important educational psychologists and is recognized by many for his theory on mankind’s hierarchy of needs. Maslow’s theory which is known as â€Å"Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs† is best explained as a pyramid of needs that we as humans must meet in order to progress to another stage of needs. There are five stages in the pyramid of needs and they go as follows: physiological, safety, love and belongingness, esteem, and finally self-actualization. MaslowRead MoreMaslow s The Hierarchy Of Needs1769 Words   |  8 Pages Summary of Maslow’s The Hierarchy of Needs Jennifer Thompson Arkansas Tech University Author Note This individual research paper is being submitted on October 13, 2014 for Loretta Cochran’s Management [BUAD 3123] course. â€Æ' Summary of Maslow’s The Hierarchy of Needs Abraham Maslow developed the theories of motivation because he felt that the sophistication of human behavior could not be portrayed through reinforcement or rewards. He felt that human action were directed toward realizationRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1498 Words   |  6 Pagesjust want to survive in life they want to flourish. Maslow s hierarchy of needs explains to us a ranking of needs for most essential to the least. While the interactionist point of view explains how humans are social creatures and social interaction is just as important as all of the other needs listed on Maslow’s Model. Maslow s hierarchy of needs is a ranking of needs for most essential to the least. Corrections Today explains that Abraham Maslow was an American psychologist born in New York, heRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1846 Words   |  8 PagesAbraham Maslow developed the Hierarchy of needs (HON) to try and explain human psychological developments and how these manifest themselves into a worker’s life. We will explore some issues brought up by the model and why it may lack a certain the degree of unification and how it could potentially work better if entwined with other views. Motivation is the â€Å"word derived from the word ’motive’ It’s the process of stimulating people to actions to accomplish the goals† (guide, 2017) Also, MaslowRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs Essay1527 Words   |  7 Pages This international technology company demands strong motivation, stupendous leadership and great understanding between workers. Leaders need to create willingness amongst the employees to operate at their highest potential; this willingness is referred to as motivation. This report is based on a content/needs theory of motivation (Maslow’s hierarchy of needs). It consists of two pieces of primary research on the theory. The first one summarises worker motivation on selected construction sites inRead MoreMaslow s Hierarchy Of Needs1388 Words   |  6 Pages Abraham Maslow was an American philosopher who was born in the early 1990 s in Brooklyn, New York. He was one of the leading theorists that promoted humanistic psychology during his era. Maslow sought to understand what motivates and inspires individuals. He theorized that individuals possess and hold a group of motivation and incentive systems not related to plunder or insensible desires. Maslow declared that people are motivated and provoked to attain certain needs. When one need is fulfilled

Friday, December 27, 2019

How Technology Affects The Development Of Friendships

Every day, all around us, technology is advancing and evolving. It is creating a diverse world to live in and altering the way people live it. From the games played to the food eaten, from education to employment, Technology has played an important role in nearly all the changing techniques. Simple ideas to complex concepts, there is way that we use these progressions to simplify ordinary daily tasks. But not all of these developments are always needed and can provide answers for certain areas. Not always can technology help identify problems and rectify them. A great impact has been on the development of friendships and how they have changed from playground banter and face to face dealings to social networking interaction and non-contact gaming. The introduction at a younger age to these sources has a noticeable effect and could be seen to create isolation and the ability to develop intimate relations and interaction skills. As Bowlby stated (1944, citied in Custance, 2015) future relationships were built upon attachments from childhood. The way a child develops through each stage can have a massive impact on the ability to create communications physically and mentally with others. Despite the downsides to the increase in technology use, there are also many benefits and positives. Relationships can be created and maintained within distances. Families can keep in contact with each other if live distances apart and geographical locations will not play a part in theShow MoreRelatedHow Social Media Affects Tangible Relationships Social Interaction1698 Words   |  7 PagesFor the past couple of years, I’ve noticed a change in how my generation communicates with one another in comparison to older generations. Recent technological innovations, such as social media networking sites has been said to alter the way in which we communicate and the interaction we obtain face-to-face. According to Charles Blow, author of Friends, Neighbors, and Facebook,  "Social networks are rewiring our relationships and our keyboard communities are affecting the attachments in our actualRead MoreEssay on Technology Negatively Affects Children1180 Words   |  5 Pagesage. â€Å"Technology has blended in with daily activity to become a way of life and children today take for granted all of which is automated. It is hard for kids nowadays to imagine a world that existed without all of the gadgets, electronics and seamless operations that computer technology provides.† (3) â€Å"Children in the United States devote some 40 hours a week to television, video games and the Internet.† (12) Many psychologists and researchers are concerned about the impact that technology has onRead MoreAnalysis Of Connected But Alone By Sherry Turkle1155 Words   |  5 PagesIn the Connected, but Alone? Ted talk, Sherry Turkle argues that technology is a major influence on our social interaction during this time era. The technological world brings us toge ther, but also separates us from this present reality. In Turkles speech she explains that when people should interact socially face to face instead they turn to their phones and do not give their full attention to the others who are in the room or environment at that time. Friends, coworkers, and family members feelRead MoreDescription And Objective Of Friendship Baptist Church1507 Words   |  7 PagesProduct Description/Objective Friendship Missionary Baptist Church seeks to connect people who are seeking or looking for deep moral truths and values based in love, selflessness and service to others with the Life and teachings of Jesus Christ. Friendship Baptist Church, founded in 1976, by a small contingency of disgruntled members of a local church. The group separated from the offending church and elected their first leader. A demographic profile of the group is African American (five women andRead MoreThe Industrial Revolution And Agricultural Revolution1509 Words   |  7 Pageshroughout history, sociological developments such as the Industrial Revolution and Agricultural Revolution have paved the way for the creation of new and innovative advancements in the expansion of society. Today, society is subject to an all-encompassing Communication Revolution. Thanks to the plethora of technological improvements and communication technology released almost routinely, it is easier than ever before to stay in touc h with people from all over the world through multiple means of communicationRead MoreTardanico discusses how lack of face-to-face communication can lead to miscommunication. She starts1100 Words   |  5 Pagesdiscusses how lack of face-to-face communication can lead to miscommunication. She starts off the article with an anecdote about a mother texting her daughter who is away at college and based on the messages exchanged the daughter seems to be doing just fine. She used various emoji’s expressing happiness. No one knew that she had been isolated in her room portraying signs of depression, an entirely different world from the one portrayed on Facebook, Twitter, and to her mother. â€Å"Awash in technology, anyoneRead MoreThe Effects of Social Networking upon Society1100 Words   |  5 Pagescommunication. However, this type of technology might be doing more harm than good. It is not only changing how we communicate, but how we interact with each other in daily life. Today, stated that â€Å"With the rise of websites such as Facebook, social networking may be on the verge of replacing traditional personal interactions for the next generation† (1).Traditional interactions will continue to be at risk if we don’t realize the effects of our social media. Social networking affects our lives in many ways, includingRead MoreFace Against Face And Sns Essay1111 Words   |  5 Pages(Duggan, Ellison, Lampe, Lenhart, Madden, 2015). Recently technology development indubitably has had an enormous impact on the way of our communication. Despite a few similarities, the communication style between face-to-face and SNS are some crucial and determinative diffe rences such as the style of conveying emotions, the number of connection and self-disclosure. The socializing using face-to-face and texts are decisively different in how to convey emotion to other people. The traditional way ofRead MoreEnvironmental Factors of Human Growth1610 Words   |  7 Pagesenvironment, but do you stop to think what it really means, what it contains, and how it affects you? The actual definition of environment is the circumstances, objects, or conditions by which one is surrounded (Merriam-Webster dictionary). Your environment greatly impacts the way you are as a human being. Each and every one of your life experiences are influenced by your environment. Your environment determines if or how your potential to develop is reached. Family, friends, home, school, etc. are allRead MoreMiddle Childhood. Middle Childhood Is Where My Passion1009 Words   |  5 Pagesfrom 6-11 years old kids. A brief description of what middle childhood is, â€Å"The school years are marked by improved athletic abilities; more logical thought processes; mastery of basic li teracy skills; advances in self-understanding, morality, and friendship; and the beginnings of peer-group membership† (Berk, 2017, p. 6). I find this age group relevant to my future because I want to pursue a career in elementary school teaching or counseling. Every Sunday at my church I work in the elementary age

Thursday, December 19, 2019

Response Paper The Impact of Cultural Stereotypes

29 January 2012 Response Paper: The Impact of Cultural Stereotypes Studying language and why people stereotype others can help people understand where some of their feelings about language and culture come from and what they can do to avoid stereotyping people (Van Ginneken, 2007). Cultural stereotypes have a big impact on the daily lives of people, especially after a major event that affects a certain group or was created by people in a certain group. For example, one of the biggest stereotyping issues came about after 9/11, when Arabs and Muslims were stereotyped as all being terrorists. Of course thats not the case, but because some of the people in that group did something horrible, many Americans (and others) decided that all people who came from that group were bad and should not be trusted. Culture, language, and even a persons regional accent can create opportunities for stereotyping, but people generally learn their language and culture from other around them, and that makes them unique to their environment and culture - not bad, but merely different, which provides a learning opportunity. What took place on 9/11 was very unfortunate for people in the Muslim and Arab groups who were just trying to make a living and who did not mean anyone else any harm. Even though it has been over ten years since 9/11 took place, the stereotype of Arabs and Muslims still exists. The odds are high that the stereotype will never go away, and that those groups will alwaysShow MoreRelatedThe Awareness Through Performance : Privilege Unplugged, An Event That Took Place957 Words   |  4 PagesThe cultural event that I chose to attend was the Awareness Through Performance: Privilege Unplugged, an event that took place on February 22nd at the Cartwright center. The focus of this event was to raise awareness in a predominately white campus and community, about the impact that white privilege has on minorities in American society today. The ATP Troupe acted out a series of scenarios that dep icted different topics such as racism, identity, privilege, and cultural differences in a way thatRead MoreWhat Does Ethnicity Affect A Person s Identity?1735 Words   |  7 Pagesracial scripts. I conducted interviews with a Japanese American and a Mexican American to see how their ethnicity has affected them when it comes to interaction with other people. I am interested to see how big of an impact would being a model minority or being stuck in negative stereotype affect how they are treated. Through these interviews I believe that it will show how big of a role ethnicity plays in a person’s identity in a multicultural society. For the past decades, Japanese Americans haveRead MoreStereotypes And Stereotypes Of African American Students Essay1148 Words   |  5 PagesStereotypes can be defined as schemas applied to a group of people sharing common physical, biological or racial characteristics. Focusing on education, African American students had consistently been negatively stereotyped about their intellectual abilities. Research indicates that racial stereotypes negatively affect African American students’ academic performance. This correlation, though, is clearest among salient African American students, implying that psychological factors may result fromRead MoreArt Is The Visual Manifestation And Application Of Human Creativity Essay1246 Words   |  5 Pagesmultifunctional, in that it has the ability to transcend the visual by evoking an emotional response in a non-verbal way. In art, artists are able to utilize their medium to connect their personal message to the audience in a non- traditi onal manner. Disarming the audience by presenting a new perspective on critical issues through the implementation of art and can help combat problems concerning identity politics and stereotypes. Artists have the aptitude to inspire change in their world by shattering conventionalRead MoreDiversity Paper1117 Words   |  5 Pageswith others. While much of behavior may be thought to be innate, there are also external factors that can impact an individuals behavior. These factors have diversity and demographic characteristics; four of these factors will be discussed in this paper and the impact each has on individuals will be shown. Religion, personality traits, age and gender are thought to have the greatest impacts and therefore providing the best opportunity for discussion. Religion Since the beginning of documentedRead MoreGender Roles Of Early Childhood Development932 Words   |  4 PagesGender Roles in Early Childhood Development In a society filled with gender stereotypes, children often adopt gender roles as they move from childhood to adolescence because of the many factors that influence their views to the point they will deny certain roles because it does not fit the gender bias. During the early years, boys and girls will usually be drawn towards gender specific activities. Playing house for example, they little boy will imitate going to work, while the little girl will imitateRead MoreRacism And Aversive Racism1618 Words   |  7 Pagesnews media, can help sociologists come to better understand the realities of black members of societies with historical ties to white supremacy, such as Canada. Racism’s effects are seen in the place black Canadians must make for themselves in our cultural institutions, a challenge discussed by artist Esmaa Mohamoud (Parris 2017). The extent of racism in the Canadian context can also be made clear through measures such as income, as seen in analysis in the Toront o Star by Laurie Monsebraaten (MonsebraatenRead MoreThe Definition Of Blind By Texas State University1345 Words   |  6 Pagestold so; therefore, the color blue is calmness. I do not mind people asking questions and listen to my responses because it shows that they are interested in my lifestyle and who I am (Question 6 7). Overall, I cannot complain about day-to-day life. There are many struggles I have to overcome as well as stereotypes against my community of people but everyone encounters struggles and stereotypes just in different manners. I love being associated with the blind culture. If people were more educatedRead MoreThe Disparity During The Performance Of Tests1035 Words   |  5 Pagesdifferences are due to cultural differences, while others point to cultural deficiencies and deprivation as possible explanations. However, whichever way they look at it, it is obvious that tests are culturally biased; they are unfair and discriminate against minority groups. I will explore this view further in this paper. There can only be two reasons for the disparity witnessed in the performance of tests: either people from some cultural groups have different capabilities or some cultural groups face greaterRead MoreHow Diverse Learning Environment Shape University Students Learning Experience Essay1521 Words   |  7 Pagesoptimum but there are factors that contribute to such environments. Among these factors are diversity which requires appreciation of other cultural, social, ethnic, religious and other backgrounds by both the institution and students. In order to full appreciate diversity, it is important to break all forms of stereotypes that are the source of imbalances. This paper looks at how diverse learning environment shape university students learning experience. Introduction A learning environment as described